June 23, 2019

Series Sunday: T is for Trespass

(Kinsey Millhone #20) 

Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

My Series Sunday pick is T is for Trespass, the 20th book in the Kinsey Millhone alphabet series by the now-deceased Sue Grafton. In the first style of its kind in this series, the narrator shifts from the main character, Kinsey Millhone the Private Investigator, to Solana Rojas—a sociopath. Or whatever her real name is because this one was stolen. Readers see firsthand what Solana Rojas is up to but the suspense lies in when, and how, Kinsey finds out.

"I believe, as many people do, that things happen for a reason. I'm not convinced there's a Grand Plan in place, but I do know that impulse and chance play a role in the Universe, as does coincidence. There are no accidents." ~ pg. 199

T is for Trespass just may be the most unsettling novel of the series. It addresses elder abuse, manipulation, private caregiver horrors and identity theft. I must say, Kinsey Millhone handled her own and showed readers a compassionate side to her character.

My 5-heart rating is a big improvement from the last book I read of this series, S is for Silence. Thank goodness the whole series didn't go downhill from there. I am quite impressed that Sue Grafton kept up a strong heroine and storyline for 20+ books. Indeed an accomplishment! My dear mystery bookhearts, if you still have not started this series...join the reading challenge and catch up!

Author: Sue Grafton
Published: December 2007
Pages: 387
Edition: Hardcover
Challenge: Perpetual Kinsey Millhone 
Rating: 🖤 🖤 🖤 🖤 🖤

June 21, 2019

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"I don't know why I'm writing this. That's not true. Maybe I do know and just don't want to admit it to myself."

~  The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides 

June 19, 2019

Juneteenth Dedication

Take a moment to reflect, rejoice and celebrate Juneteenth. We are because our ancestors were risk-takers, brave hearts and fearless leaders. Be proud, carry on the legacy and remember those we lost.

06.19.2019 is dedicated to my cousin. Heaven couldn't wait for you.

And to everyone else: Live and Love free-ish! 

  

June 18, 2019

The Escape Room


"How much trouble could four investment bankers get into in a locked elevator?" ~ 96%

An escape room challenge becomes a life-or-death situation. Four young professionals participate in a team-building activity. Emotions and imaginations rise when the lights go out and they are trapped. But the cryptic clues are more like dangerous truths. Terrible deeds they committed climbing up the corporate ladder are revealed. It becomes clear that someone has to die in order for others to survive.

Was it realistic? For sure. Especially for people that have participated in an escape room before with only minutes left on the clock to decipher senseless clues and no escape in sight. Oh, just me? Okay. Well, the feeling of being trapped is real. Teamwork becomes every man looking out for him/herself. Then when you finally escape, you think of how you overanalyzed the whole scenario. Kind of how I felt about this new book. I overanalyzed the storyline so the ending fell flat.

"This is too fucking real for my liking." ~ 11%

There was so much buildup in The Escape Room. Lots of information for readers to wade through. Perhaps it was the author's tactic for a suspenseful thriller; although, it seemed like filler material. It gave me R.L. Stine Fear Street vibes. I loved those but I was not expecting it from The Escape Room. Nevertheless, I finished reading with a sense of nostalgia for the simpler times of thriller. 

Happy Early Pub Day, Megan Goldin. The Escape Room will be available Tuesday, July 30.

Disclaimer: This book was received directly from the publisher for review purposes only. In no way does it influence my review. The opinions I have expressed are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: The Escape Room
Author: Megan Goldin
Published: July 2019
Pages: 352
Edition: Galley
Rating: 🖤 🖤

June 16, 2019

Series Sunday: The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind

(Unknown Series #1) 

Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

My Series Sunday pick is The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind, presumably the first book in a series by Jackson Ford. (It is not categorized as a new series but the story continues in a book to be released later.)

Why did I choose to review an advance copy of The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind? Well the cover grabbed my attention first. Random objects are flying in space such as a pair of Chucks, a rubik's cube, cup of coffee, movie theater popcorn bucket and a yellow rubber ducky. I read the title next and now I am reeled in. This must be good, right?

"Hell has nothing to do with fire." ~ 86%

The ever so witty Teagan Frost has psychokinetic powers. The government uses her secret skill for odd missions. It's all paid fun and games until a dead body turns up at the last job site. Guess who is suspect #1? Teagan has 24 hours to clear her name and protect her beloved hometown of Los Angeles. S/O to Slauson Ave 💙

The easygoing writing style and language makes the main character so darn likable! Too bad this book is better suited for young adults; the dialogue is simplistic with sprinkles of juvenile cursing and the storyline itself is nothing to mull over. Us grown folk will lose interest real fast and grow bored very quickly. If it were not for the main girl, I would have given up reading far sooner. Yes, I like easy reads in the warmer months but not this basic.

If you are looking for a book to occupy a teenager during the summer school break, this is ideal. And just maybe they will be interested in Random Sh*t Flying Through the Air where the story continues.

Happy Early Pub Day, Jackson Ford. The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t With Her Mind will be available Tuesday, June 18.

Disclaimer: This book was received directly from the publisher for review purposes only. In no way does it influence my review. The opinions I have expressed are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Author: Jackson Ford
Published: June 2019
Pages: 352
Edition: Galley
Rating: 🖤 🖤

June 14, 2019

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"It was a midnight like any other at the store. The lights were on out front, the door unlocked, the grate rolled halfway up. Dapper Dan's Boutique was open."

~ Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem by Daniel R. Day 

June 12, 2019

One Night in Georgia


"Not only do we have to contend with white racists, we also have to contend with racism within our own race. The lighter you are, the better you are is slave plantation bullshit." ~ 21%

It is the summer of 1968 (before my time). It is an unfortunate part of our history marked by the tragic assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., race riots and political protests. Zelda Livingston, Veronica Cook and Daphne Brooks head to Atlanta for their senior year at Spelman College.

As is the case for most longtime friends, the three women come from different backgrounds. Zelda comes from a line of freedom riders. Veronica grew up privileged and wealthy, strongly believing in racial uplift. Daphne lost her black mother to suicide and was abandoned by her white father. These young black women have every intention to create lasting memories on this road trip.

I cannot imagine having to travel with a special guidebook to find racially friendly gas stations, food or rest stops. Yet these women had to. Things start going awry as they reach the Mason-Dixon line. A racially hostile situation leaves a white person dead and one of the girls holding the smoking gun.

"Do something spontaneous for once in your boring life. Don't think, do." ~ 6%

Chickadee and I often talk about how not much has really changed between the 60s and today. The world is still divided by race. Blacks are still stereotyped and wronged. Black men are often mistaken for real criminals all because of a general description. And Black women hold families together carrying the burdens on their bare shoulders. It is disheartening. Reading what little I did of One Night in Georgia was a reminder.

If that was not clear enough, let me say it directly: I DNF (did not finish) One Night in Georgia. The premise seemed promising but it was way too much dialogue. Enough saying; more describing! I read further than my 50-Page Rule because I really wanted to get through it but nope. I hope someone else has better luck getting through it.

Happy Early Pub Day, Celeste O. Norfleet. One Night in Georgia will be available Tuesday, June 18.

Disclaimer: This book was received directly from publisher for review purposes only. In no way does it influence my review. The opinions I have expressed are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: One Night in Georgia
Author: Celeste O. Norfleet
Published: June 2019
Pages: 304
Edition: Galley
Rating: DNF