November 28, 2021

Series Sunday: Under Color of Law

(Trevor Finnegan #1) 


Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

"I make being a police officer sound storybook—the sanctified knight gallivanting through the countryside, facing down the dire and dark. It's some potent panty-peeler, but it couldn't be further from the truth." ~ 5%

My Series Sunday pick is Under Color of Law, the first book in the Trevor Finnegan series by Aaron Philip Clark. This new main character is a good cop but hasn't been a good man in a long while. He doesn't show emotion. He knows the department has a diversity problem. Yet he somehow climbed the ladder fairly quickly. And why is that?

Black rookie cop Trevor "Finn" Finnegan wants to become the top-ranking officer in the LAPD. His goal is to fix the broken department. So his fast-track promotion to detective in the coveted Robbery-Homicide division puts him closer to achieving his goal. 

The city of Los Angeles calls for police accountability. In the midst of racial justice protests and senseless killings by cops, the body of a Black police academy recruit is found. Of course, Finn is tasked to investigate the murder. The suspenseful story spins into a web of corruption, violence, race and cover-ups.

"The only thing that separates a cop and a convict is getting caught." ~ 69%

First of all, I fell in like with Finn when he drank his second cup of Earl Grey. Now this is a character that knows his tea! I liked him even more when he realized the burden of knowledge is crushing. Do you know how long it takes people IRL to figure this out? Yet we have a fictional man of color that is in tune with his intellect and faults. Hello, Under Color of Law and the Trevor Finnegan series!

Aaron Philip Clark, I am your new fan. Your description of a warm night's air is so detailed that I could feel the summer energy through my Kindle. Your creation of a strong Black character is solid. And most of all, your depiction of cops and police departments is what most of us are thinking but not saying aloud. Thank you for not making this first book in series the end of Finn's career or life. We need him in the book series world.

Under Color of Law is so. damn. good! I am looking forward to Blue Like Me late in the new year.

Author: Aaron Philip Clark
Published: October 2021
Pages: 298
Edition: eBook
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

November 26, 2021

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"When people say 'terminal', I think of the airport."

~ The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot by Marianne Cronin 


November 16, 2021

Rare Danger


"Fine-as-frog-hair jet pilots. Missing old folks. Town cars. Suspect foreigners." ~ pg. 46

There's a misconception that librarian's lead a quiet life. In Rare Danger, this theory is put to the page-turning test as book curator, Jasmine Ware, is led on an adventure of suspense, murder and romance. Jasmine has an exclusive clientele and her work is her passion. Until an old friend of the family, a dealer of rare books, goes missing and his partner is murdered. Jasmine is drawn deep into a plot that could cost her life.

Torr Noble is a handsome Air Force veteran now working private security. He is used to adrenaline-pumping situations. Through a recommendation for his private library, he meets the intriguing Jasmine Ware. Soon their connection turns sexy hot and high stakes as they work together to find the missing book dealer. Their attraction leaps off the pages!

Romance AND mystery...what a treat! My one gripe is I wish it were longer. As a result, the romance was a bit rushed. A novella was simply not long enough with these memorable characters. Fingers crossed they make a cameo in upcoming releases. Not too many authors have the writing skill to develop characters, tell a full story and create suspense in as little as 100 pages, yet Ms. Bev Jenkins masterfully does the job in Rare Danger

Many thanks for playing in the romantic suspense sandbox and for the perfect setting of Detroit, Michigan. We Hustle Harder!

Happy Pub Day, Ms. Bev Jenkins! Rare Danger is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: Rare Danger
Author: Beverly Jenkins
Published: November 2021
Pages: 112
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

November 9, 2021

Midnight Hour


"The flames sputtered hot and large. They licked the sides of the pot as if they would be able to sustain that level of passion forever." ~ 48%

Midnight Hour is a new anthology of crime fiction by 20 authors of color. Yes, twenty!

It is a good introduction to authors I'd never read; although, I preferred the short stories by authors I am already familiar with such as Abby L. Vandiver and Tracy Clark. The stories are all about crime committed around midnight. Grisly murders, guns, duped investors, damaged women and intended victims fill the pages. Different cultures are featured. Several writing styles are within. However, none of the stories were memorable enough to call a favorite.

Perfect for readers that like short story collections and those interested in discovering new crime fiction authors.

Happy Pub Day, Abby L. Vandiver and contributing authors! Midnight Hour is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: Midnight Hour
Editor: Abby L. Vandiver
Authors: Various
Published: November 2021
Pages: 336
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€

November 7, 2021

Series Sunday: Body and Soul Food

(Books & Biscuits #1) 


Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

"A killer comes to your house and takes a book." ~ 21%

My Series Sunday pick is Body and Soul Food, the first book in the Books & Biscuits Mystery series by Abby Collette. Fraternal twins Koby and Keaton track down a killer while preparing to open their new bookstore and soul food cafΓ©, Books & Biscuits. (I need this place in real life!)

Introducing Koby Hill and Keaton Rutledge! Twins with different last names?! Orphaned at age two, they were separated but their bond lingered. Years later, they reunite and decide to open a business capitalizing on their shared interests: books and soul food. But with just a week to go before the grand opening, Keaton finds Koby's foster brother murdered.

I love new cozy mysteries and this new series fed my soul! Matter of fact, I am going on the record to say Koby and Keaton are my new favorite storybook siblings in a series. Of course they have twin vibes but their chemistry is strong! Collette writes their dialogue in a way that strengthens their character development. Readers can learn a lot through conversations and less setting the stage in lengthy paragraphs. Well done!

"Tangential reference." ~ 42%

The thing with cozy mysteries are they literally fall into the character's lap (or kitchen). The main character either owns the restaurant (scene of the crime) or is the main suspect. But in Body and Soul Food, it is different than the norm. The victim is family. The murder takes place on public transit. The police are more useless than useful. And the main characters—though they are possible suspects—are trying to solve the murder for reasons other than clearing their name.

I've read a lot of Abby's books so trust when I say this series is her best...so far. Treat your body to a little soul food and pre-order this new cozy mystery featuring characters of color. I am sure you will enjoy it, Bookhearts. 

Happy Early Pub Day, Abby Collette! Body and Soul Food will be available Tuesday, November 9.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Author: Abby Collette 
Published: November 2021
Pages: 336
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

November 5, 2021

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"They cut off his hands!"

~ Rare Danger by Beverly Jenkins


October 31, 2021

Series Sunday: Fear Street: Part One 1994

(Fear Street #1) 


Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read or watch an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

My Series Sunday pick is Fear Street: Part One 1994, the first movie in the Fear Street film trilogy on Netflix based on the book series by R.L. Stine. What better weekend than Halloween to finally watch?

The movies are not based on one specific book but Fear Street: 1994 draws heavily upon Fear Street Cheerleader Saga: The First Evil. From what I remember in the book, two newcomer sisters desperately want to make the cheerleading squad. Soon as they're named to the team, horrific things happen.

In the Netflix adaptation, there are brutal slayings at the mall, including a cheerleader at Shadyside High. A teen girl in the band and her friends take on the ancient evil responsible for the murders.

Talk about memories! The first scene takes place in B. Dalton bookstore located in Shadyside Mall. The cashier answers a call on a big block phone with a long ass antenna. She stacks the shelves with books by an author named Robert Lawrence. The music—specifically Snoop Dogg's Gz and Hustlas—is so 90s! The murders are brutal, bloody and sudden just like in the book series. The suspense is borderline corny and there is no parental figure in sight damn near the whole movie. Again, just like the classic books. It is all so nostalgic and I loved it!

Title: Fear Street: Part One 1994
Author: R.L. Stine
Director: Leigh Janiak
Cast: Kiana Madeira (Deena); Benjamin Flores Jr. (Josh); Olivia Scott Welch (Sam); Julia Rehwald (Kate); Fred Hechinger (Simon)
Book Published: 1992
Movie Released: June 2021
Movie Time: 1 Hour, 47 Min
Book Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€
Movie Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ 

October 29, 2021

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"We live in the dregs of Queens, New York, where airplanes fly so low that we are certain they will crush us."

~ Brown Girls by Daphne Palasi Andreades 


October 24, 2021

Series Sunday: Better Off Dead

(Jack Reacher #26) 


Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

"They said they'd cut my eyelids off, to make sure I saw everything." ~ 28%

My Series Sunday pick is Better Off Dead, the 26th book in the Jack Reacher series by Lee Child and now his brother, Andrew. Pick a fight with Reacher and soon find out you are better off dead. Hence the perfect title!

In a huge plot twist, the latest installment of the series begins with our main character dead on a slab in a morgue. Panic set in immediately since I am nowhere near ready for this series to end. The story rewinds to a few days prior when Reacher is doing what he does best—roaming west with no destination—when he comes upon a Jeep crashed into a tree with a woman slumped over the wheel. 

Enter Michaela Fenton, an army veteran turned FBI agent searching for her twin brother who is mixed up with some dangerous people led by a mysterious man named Dendoncker. He rules from the shadows and rarely comes into sight. But leave it up to Reacher to seek Dendoncker out and help find a missing person.

"There was nothing to suggest the place was owned by a murderer. That it was the hub of a smuggling operation." ~ 58%

For those unfamiliar, I am reading the Jack Reacher series in the most untraditional way (backward). I read every new book soon as its published (S/O to the publisher for an advance copy); in between new releases, I read from the beginning of series. Each book may be read as a standalone and the mysteries do not overlap so it is not confusing. There is nothing much to Reacher's personal life that needs to be revealed in chronological order far as I can tell. And might I say, this series continues to impress me with its thrilling storylines, attention to detail, descriptive action and consistency. 

Don't let the page count fool you! I know 520 pages sounds like a big ass commitment but I assure you Better Off Dead is fast-paced, full of action and a really good mystery that will keep you interested. I turned the pages faster than Reacher could disarm a threat. It only took a few days for me to read the entire book and I actually want more! This brother duo is doing an awesome job co-authoring what I now call the Jack "Fucking Fearless" Reacher series.

Happy Early Pub Day, Lee and Andrew Child! Better Off Dead will be available Tuesday, October 26.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Author: Lee and Andrew Child
Published: October 2021
Pages: 520
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

October 22, 2021

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"We could start the story of this book when you texted me to ask if we could talk, and I thought you wanted to continue our ongoing conversation about wallpaper and landscaping—but what came before that? When did the idea for this book come to you?"

You Are Your Best Thing edited by Tarana Burke and BrenΓ© Brown

October 19, 2021

Carefree Black Girls


"What does it mean to claim 'carefree' when Black women at all intersections are often not always afforded the privilege to walk through the world unbothered?" ~ 81% 

Oh, we are going deep deep! This was my thought upon reading the first couple pages of Carefree Black Girls: A Celebration of Black Women in Popular Culture. At a time when she was falling apart, Zeba Blay wrote essays about Black women to put herself together again and get through. She became reacquainted with joy and freedom. 

Zeba Blay touches on subjects relevant to black women: daring to exist in a fat body, not acknowledging blackness, strong black leads, losing ourselves in something other than own pain, mental illness/depression, healthy and damaging manifestation and severe procrastination. Listen, it gets real within these 240 pages. I finished this non-fiction eBook with lots of highlights and annotations.

"I feel like I'm running out of time to be happy." ~ 77%

Zeba Blay claims this book as an offering. Fact! As Black women, we are acutely aware of our influential existence and the stereotypes (Angry Black Woman, THOT, Mammy, etc.) it holds in American society. But to be carefree is to be empowering. So well said in this collection of essays. So thank you to Zeba Blay for that 2013 viral tweet that coined the term #carefreeblackgirl. It created a positive space for celebration and freedom for black women online.

Happy Pub Day, Zeba Blay! Carefree Black Girls is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: Carefree Black Girls
Author: Zeba Blay
Published: October 2021
Pages: 240
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

October 12, 2021

The Party Crasher


"You can be 'over' something and still discuss it, surely?" ~ 11%

It's been over two years since Effie's parents got divorced. Since then, she's been estranged from her father and feuding with his much younger girlfriend. And now, Greenoaks, the country house that Effie grew up in, has been sold. They are throwing a grand party but Effie is originally left off the guest list, then receives a last-minute invitation to which she declines. No surprise there.

Then Effie remembers her beloved childhood Russian dolls are still hidden in the house. What better chance to retrieve them than when everyone is busy celebrating...hence, party crasher! As she sneaks around Greenoaks, she overhears conversations, reveals secrets and sees her family in a different light. The Party Crasher is meant to be lighthearted and funny but ends up a silly mess.

"I'm actually losing it." ~ 33%

...AND my interest! I never thought I would utter these words but, am I over Sophie Kinsella?! Please let it not be so! There was a time that I eagerly read every new release, got lost in the frivolous lives of cheeky characters, enjoyed the British English dialect and giggled at the ridiculousness of the situations in stories. Mindless chick lit reading at its finest. But The Party Crasher was a struggle to finish!

Was it the main character? Effie was annoyingly not honest with herself. She refused to confront the past and learn from mistakes. And the idea of the whole party crashing thing was just silly. By the end, I realized a whole bunch of nothing happened in the 300+ pages I spent precious time reading. Usually I would have given up at page 50 but kept on because of my loyalty for the author. Bookhearts, take my word for it and pass on this. #IssaBust 

Happy Pub Day, Sophie Kinsella! The Party Crasher is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: The Party Crasher
Author: Sophie Kinsella
Published: October 2021
Pages: 368
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€

October 5, 2021

Bad Fat Black Girl


"In the past, trap seemed to be at odds with the rest of my identity as a feminist. I'd been advocating for Black women, leading organizing efforts around issues like free access to birth control, and teaching incoming freshman about rape culture. But now it no longer seemed contradictory to be bumping Gucci or Jeezy at full volume while whipping Sandy around campus." ~ 4%

Sesali Bowen is the self-proclaimed trap feminist. The funny fearless entertainment journalist grew up on the south side of Chicago and learned early on how to hustle, champion other Black women and navigate fat phobia, poverty, friendship and self-love. Her love of trap music led her to hip hop journalism where she soon found the balance between feminism and hip hop.

Bowen treats us to personal essays in this debut memoir titled Bad Fat Black Girl: Notes from a Trap Feminist. The cover is very eye-catching and matches the content. She shares how trap music lyrics often conflicts with her support of Black women and being a feminist. Phrases like "bad bitches" and "top notch hoes" float across tracks that she may sing along to but not necessarily overlook. Neither does it diminish her confidence or own identity. 

"When people joke that 'Knuck If You Buck' is an old Negro spiritual, they're referencing the surge of emotion and adrenaline Black folks feel when it comes on." ~ 31%

I can certainly relate. I can rap along to a lot of songs and still be able to disconnect myself from the women described in lyrics. I know my worth. I know what I am and what I am not. I am one of the most polite people you will ever meet but will still rhyme Diamond's verse word-for-word like I'm a fighter. I still advocate for women's rights but you can't tell me I'm not the Susie that Gucci thinks he loves. And Bowen totally understands and translates this well! 

Bad Fat Black Girl will probably be dissected by scholars or music critics. I found it to be an agreeable, entertaining read and recommend for others. You don't have to like trap music to enjoy but it will definitely enhance your reading experience of this new memoir.

Happy Pub Day, Sesali Bowen! Bad Fat Black Girl is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: Bad Fat Black Girl
Author: Sesali Bowen
Published: October 2021
Pages: 272
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

Per My Last Email


"I don't take to flummery." ~ 12%

There are only so many times to say, "checking status" or "following up" or "circle back." I am certainly tired of prefacing emails when I have to repeat myself with "per my last email." As I am sure the recipients of such emails probably feel a certain way. Well there is a new hilarious guide titled Per My Last Email: Curious Words and Clever Phrases to Vivify, Excite, Delight Your Work World to help reinvigorate your vocabulary with alternatives to stale corporate lingo.

I've been in Corporate America for 19 years and picked up a few odd phrases such as, "full plate" when I am overextended with work, "water-cooler talk" when office gossiping, and claiming to give "110%" when that's not even possible. Thank goodness to author Stephanie K. Wright for writing an informative fun book of phrases to boost your communication game and revive your meetings all while remaining appropriate.

Per My Last Email is the resource you didn't know you needed for work or professional communication. Since reading and heavily highlighting, I have used many of its suggestions. I must say the responses I receive are positive and dare I say, productive! The author has clearly tried and proved these methods are effective. Add this to your nonfiction pile, Bookhearts, and thank me later!

Happy Pub Day, Stephanie K. Wright! Per My Last Email is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: Per My Last Email
Author: Stephanie K. Wright
Published: October 2021
Pages: 128
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

October 1, 2021

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.

"He put his foot in those greens."

~ Body and Soul Food by Abby Collette

   

September 26, 2021

Series Sunday: 100 Real-Life Tales of Black Girl Magic

(Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls) 


Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

My Series Sunday pick is 100 Real-Life Tales of Black Girl Magic, a book in the Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls series edited by Lilly Workneh. One hundred (100) barrier-breaking Black women and girls are showcased in the spirit of Black Girl Magic. It begins with a foreword by CaShawn Thompson, originator of the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic. Over 60 Black authors, illustrators, and editors collaborate on incredible stories from the past and present.

This series launched in 2016 and I am just having the pleasure of reading an installment. It is very inspiring and powerful to read about Black entrepreneurs, poets, activists, artists, filmmakers, politicians, sports figures and more. This book introduced me to quite a few that really are Black Girl Magic—a phrase to uplift and praise the accomplishments of Black women. 

Highly recommend for good night stories to yourself or to the little magical girl in your life.

Happy Early Pub Day! 100 Real-Life Tales of Black Girl Magic will be available Tuesday, September 28.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Editor: Lilly Workneh
Published: September 2021
Pages: 240
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

September 24, 2021

First Lines Friday


First Lines Friday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Grab your current read(s).
  • Share the first line(s).
  • Include the title and author.


"We are the earth, the land. The tongue that speaks and trips on the names of the dead as it dares to tell these stories of a woman's line. Her people and her dirt, her trees, her water."

~ The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois by HonorΓ©e Fanonne Jeffers

September 19, 2021

Series Sunday: Kamala Harris

(Little People, Big Dreams) 


Series Sunday is a bookish meme hosted by Literary Marie. I encourage all of my fellow book bloggers and bookhearts to play along.
  • Read an installment of a series.
  • Share your review/recommendation below.
  • Include the title, author and series name.

My Series Sunday pick is Kamala Harris, a new book in the Little People, Big Dreams series. The bestselling series explore the lives of outstanding people; all of them achieved incredible things that started as big dreams. As children, we always choose what we wanna be when we grow up. The vast majority rarely become what they planned. But there are others that live out their dreams. Kamala Harris is one!

"First of color to..." ~ 50%

First woman, first Black, first South Asian American to be elected Vice President of the United States. Little Kamala accompanied her parents to civil rights marches. They would walk and push her in the stroller. As a little girl she dreamed of being a lawyer to help people. Later, she earned a law degree to make sure the most vulnerable people were protected by justice. Her dreams became true when she became a politician.

Kamala Harris is intended for beginning readers. You may also read it to babies and toddlers. Inspiring stories should start before they can even walk. The illustrations are stylish. The sentences are simple. The extra facts are educational and the historical photos add to context. 

This wonderful children's book inspires younger generations to dream big! Goals are attainable! Most of all, little people can change the world! I recommend gifting Kamala Harris to the young girl or boy in your life. If you are not surrounded by little people, purchase a copy and donate to your local library.

Happy Early Pub Day, Vegara and Semmer! Kamala Harris is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Author: Maria Isabel Sanchez Vegara
Illustrator: Lauren Semmer
Published: September 2021
Pages: 32
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€ πŸ–€

September 7, 2021

Three Girls from Bronzeville


"Sometimes you have to step back to see what up close tends to distort." ~ 14% 

Three Girls from Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood lives up to its title. Dawn, Debra and Kim live in Chicago's historic Bronzeville community. Their lives are shaped in the three square miles that are the epicenter of Black business and culture. Doctors, lawyers, street vendors, Black entrepreneurs and impressionable children make up its residents. In this coming-of-age memoir, forces bring three black girls closer while other events cause their friendship to falter at times. Dawn chronicles the dramatic turns their lives take over the decades. 

"When it's time to move on, you simply do." ~ 55% 

Parts of this memoir brought back memories. Dawn Turner's writing is so descriptive that when she mentioned "bags of sawdust for absorbing vomit," my mind immediately went to the distinct smell and circumstance because I was that kid that vomited with every migraine in school. I couldn't always make it to the waste bin or restroom fast enough. Hence, the sawdust.

Another memory sparked when Dawn would describe the close-knit community of Bronzeville. I have a close friend that lives there now and it all sounded familiar through her words. She crafted a story for fellow city girls to relate and reminisce of their own best friends and sisters growing up. 

Yet Three Girls from Bronzeville lacked the riveting factor that the summary promises. There were more slow parts than interesting. But ultimately the miss for me was the distant narrative. For the author to be one of the main girls, it felt very outside-looking-in-ish. Perhaps the author had to distance herself from the memories in order to write about them but it unfortunately came across as an observer's judgment rather than recalling own experiences. Nevertheless, whether you are a black city girl or like to read memoirs, then try reading it.

Happy Pub Day, Dawn Turner! Three Girls from Bronzeville is now available.

Disclaimer: An advance copy was received directly from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Opinions are my own and would be the same if I spent my hard-earned coins.

Title: Three Girls from Bronzeville
Author: Dawn Turner
Published: September 2021
Pages: 336
Edition: Galley
Rating: πŸ–€ πŸ–€